Can You Keep Your Pet Bird Outside in A Cage

Can You Keep Your Pet Bird Outside in A Cage

A 8 minute read by Eddie Waithaka

#cagebirds #birdscage

Most pet birds, including parrot species like parakeets and lovebirds, can be kept outside as long as you consider climate, security, noise, and predators to ensure your pet remains safe.

You also need to examine your local zoning and land laws to ensure you stay within the legal framework.

Majority of birds kept outside are housed in outdoor aviaries or flight cage, which are aesthetically pleasing, plus your birds and parrots will get better access to fresh air, natural light, and enough humidity.

Aviaries also have more room than cages for your birds to play and exercise.

In the United StatesMost pet birds, including parrot species like parakeets and lovebirds, can be kept outside as long as you consider climate, security, noise, and predators to ensure your pet remains safe.

You also need to examine your local zoning and land laws to ensure you stay within the legal framework.

Majority of birds kept outside are housed in outdoor aviaries or flight cage, which are aesthetically pleasing, plus your birds and parrots will get better access to fresh air, natural light, and enough humidity.

Aviaries also have more room than cages for your birds to play and exercise.

In the United States, California, Florida, and other warm southern states provide ideal temperature for housing birds outdoor year-round, same as Australia.

However, if you live in the Northern US states, UK or Canada, having an aviary outside is a stretch and is only feasible during summer and warmer spring and autumn months.

That said, in case you're wondering which bird species are best for outdoor aviaries, below our little Birdspundit's list that you should consider.

What Pet Birds Can Live Outside (In Outdoor Aviaries)

Below are a few birds, including parrots, that you should consider keeping in your outdoor aviary. Most of them love basking and occasional baths.

#1&mdashLovebirds

Lovebirds are fond of warm weather, considering they are native to Africa and the Indian Ocean islands.

They also enjoy frequent baths, followed by a long bask under the warming sunlight to dry off. As such, lovebirds are ideal candidates for outdoor aviaries.

However, you cannot maintain these birds outside throughout only if you live in a tropical climate where you have sun all year round. Otherwise, you are advised to have an indoor cage to house your lovebirds during colder months (winter).

#2&mdashParakeets

Parakeets like lovebirds are tropical pets. They'll enjoy moderate to warm temperature settings and the fresh air outside but are not tough enough to withstand winter in most climates.

The ideal outside temperature for these birds range from 60 to 70 degree Fahrenheit, although they can withstand heat setting of up to 85 degrees without getting uncomfortable.

At night, parakeets can stand up to 40 degrees Fahrenheit, but any setting below that, whether at night or during the day, will become uncomfortable and may develop hypothermia.

Too much heat will result in heatstroke.

#3&mdashHycinth Macaw

Hycinth macaws are large, noisy birds compared to parakeets, lovebirds, and cockatiels. For that reason, these birds are more peaceful maintained outside in large, sturdy aviaries by people with acreage.

If you decide to keep macaws outside, remember to consider the noise effect on your neighbors, plus pay keen attention to your local area zoning requirements...

...and if you live in a populated area, you may want to consider some of the less loud species, such as lovebirds and budgies. Also, note that a single bird will generally be less noisy than a pair, although several birds of different species will be quieter.

#4&mdashRainbow Lorikeets

Lorikeets are native to Australia and are used to quiet some heat. Even so, they can survive some winter cold as long as it's not extreme.

For that reason, they can be kept either inside or outside the house without much hassle.

When kept outdoors, you just need to make sure your lorikeet is protected from the wind and rain and covered in a blanket on winter night if the temperature gets too low.

Ideally, you want to cover your pet with a blanket that a little thicker than usual if the winter temperature goes below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

#4&mdashCockatiels

Same to lorikeets, cockatiels are native to Australia, meaning they are used to living in varied temperatures in the wild. Even so, as pets, they tend to lean on the less hardy side of things, and while they may enjoy the outdoors, they should not be left outside in cold weather.

Cages are fine for cockatiels if you only want to take your pet outside a few hours a day, but for birds to be house outdoor permanently, you will need an aviary.

Albeit cockatiels being somewhat quiet, they still make some noise, same as any parrot species, so also check whether you need a permit in your community zoning requirement.

#5&mdashAfrican Grey

African grey parrots are naturally flocking birds and are happy in a spacious aviary setup. As such, an outdoor enclosure made of strong mesh is their ideal living space.

Moreover, they can tolerate quite a range of temperature, but it is imperative not to subject them to sudden temperature changes.

Interestingly, African greys are among the very few bird species that can be acclimated to living outside, even in places like the UK, where the average weather is nothing more than gloomy.

They can stand some level of cold outside, sometimes as low as 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Though this does not mean it is pleasant and stress-free for the birds.

Also, keep in mind that even if your African grey lives indoors, she would need an hour (maybe a few more) daily outside.

Lastly, try not to maintain your grey alone if you are not around often. These birds get bored and lonely quite readily, and lack of company will stress them.

#6&mdashDoves and Pigeons

Doves and pigeons are the undisputed masters of outdoor living. They are amazingly active and love to make a low, sweet coo as they go along, picking bites from the ground.

They also have an out-of-this-world compass, which will always lead them back home if you let them wander off. Rest assured that's a perk you won't enjoy even with the most intelligent parrot.

Trained homing pigeons (and doves) can find their way over distances as far as 600 miles. It's, for this reason, they are the only birds suited for release in wedding, right🤷‍♂️😎...

...plus, doves are white. They represent love, peace, prosperity, and the whole shebang, you know!

As with all other birds, your dove or pigeons will enjoy the summer sun outside, but not so much the winter cold. So, bring them inside when it gets too chilly or place a lamp in a coop that is tight enough.

#7&mdashAmazon Parrots

Amazon parrots are fairly large birds native to the rainforest of Central and Southern America that enjoy plenty of space to play and be active.

They are generally distinguished by their bright green plumage and stocky build with short rounded tails, but each species has its own individual colorful markings.

Amazon parrots require a lot of attention and should be paired up with the same species, opposite sex bird, for lifetime companionship. For this reason, and their need for space, they do best when housed in a large outdoor aviary.

The cage should be enclosed with strong mesh free of zinc and with an easily cleanable floor and plenty of room for the birds to fly.

#8&mdashCanaries

Canaries species kept as pets are beautiful, friendly, and genial, soft-billed birds with largely yellow-bodies and are easy to keep and look after.

They can be kept indoors, but because they like the company of their own species, they are best housed outdoor in a purpose-built aviary.

Kept outdoors, the aviary should allow your birds enough room to fly around properly. Canaries species are generally active and love exercise, and movement for them is a must.

Also, make sure your aviary is located away from droughts and direct sunlight since canaries, like all birds, love the sun only in moderation.

#8&mdashFinches

Finches can be kept either in a cage or aviary, indoors or outside. These birds are pretty hardy and able to tolerate many different environments without much problem.

But as with all birds, finches will still suffer if kept outside during the colder winter months, especially in temperate regions like the UK, Canada, and Northern state in the US.

Therefore, consider covering and insulating your aviary, and ensure it's dry and waterproof before the next chilly weather kicks in. Alternatively, have a well-sized cage ready to accommodate your finches in-house.

Happy Birding 🐦🐦.